Strange Sounding Photography Terms Explained

Photography is full of technical terms, from simple and easy to understand words to highfalutin jargon. Then there are also the funny, strange sounding words that make us smile as we wonder what it means. I gathered a list of these terms that may sound silly but are quite important in the language of photography:

hot shoe Strange Sounding Photography Terms ExplainedScrim – this is thin material (usually fabric, but seamless paper is also used) that is placed between the subject and the light to reduce its harshness or intensity.  It can be made of a gauzy, almost transparent sheet that becomes part of a diffusion panel when it is fastened on a frame. Scrims are quite handy since they are lightweight and portable, they don’t cost much and they’re very effective. Scrims are often used for outdoor shoots when you don’t want the glare of the sun to cause blown out spots or make your model squint.

Hot shoe – this is when, after hours of walking around taking pictures, your shoes and feet start to get hot. Kidding! This term refers to the clip at the top of your camera where you attach your external flash unit. It electrically links the flash to the shutter mechanism and synchronizes the two when the shutter button is triggered.

Snoot – ‘Snoot’ sounds like ‘snout’ and come to think of it, it does look like one. This is a cone shaped shield or cylinder that is attached to a light head such as a flashgun to project a concentrated light beam to the subject. It prevents light spill and allows you to direct the light to a smaller area than if there was no snoot.

Parallax – this is the image difference between what you see in the viewfinder and what the lens sees and captures. The viewfinder is not in the same exact spot as the lens, more often than not it is an inch or two above it, and so there is a variation which gets more noticeable the closer the subject is to the camera.

GoBo – slang for ‘goes beyond optics’, a gobo is something that changes or blocks the beam of light as it leaves your light source. There might be areas in your setup that you do not want lighted and this is where a gobo can come in handy. These can also be used for effect, such was with colored glass gobos or metal gobos formed into shapes (like stencils) which will create similar shadows shapes that adds to the elements in the shot. If your light beam can be adjusted from soft to strong light, it can then either make the shapes soft and diffused or hard and well defined.


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Blog, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
Tags: , ,

No Comments »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Blog, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
The iPad and the Photographer

Now that the iPad has a firm foothold in the market, many of you might be seriously interested in getting one. But like all fancy gadgets, it can take time to decide whether it is worth spending around $499. Of course, it all depends on what you will want it for. As an entertainment device, it packs quite a punch. And if you are a photographer, you might find the iPad useful in various ways.

One of its major uses would be as a portfolio. When you are looking to be hired for photo services, potential clients would want to look at samples of your work. It is quite common to show your sample images using a laptop, albums or prints. By using an iPad, you can display your photos in one gorgeous medium. After all, presentation really does count. It is more striking and sleeker than a regular photo album and more intimate than a netbook or a laptop. At 9.7 inches on its widest side and at 1024 x 768 pixel resolution, the screen is large enough for viewers to fully appreciate the images. Also, it utilizes in-plane switching (IPS) technology which allows people who are obliquely viewing the screen to still get a clear view. This is perfect for when a crowd of eager people want to see the picture you took of them all at the same time.

Another asset of the iPad is that you can upload images to it right after you take your pictures. With the use of the iPad Camera Connection Kit, you have the option to import image files using a USB cable or straight from an SD card. It supports both JPEG files and RAW formats. Right after uploading, you can even send the images by 3G (you have to sign up for this extra service) or Wi-Fi to a client who might be waiting for them. A drawback is that photo editing is limited with the iPad. It will not be the best tool to do heavy post processing since iPad photo apps do not have the extensive editing features of Photoshop and other similar software.

Although the iPad is a fantastic device, it does have its weaknesses. It does not support Flash so if your online portfolio is flash based, you will not be able to access it. It also has little storage space (64GB max) compared to netbooks or laptops, and it does not have the capacity to multi-task so you can’t receive instant messages while you are previewing your photos or fixing your slideshow. Keep in mind that this is version 1.0 and that over time there will surely be improved and more feature packed versions that might address these issues.

The iPad might not replace a netbook or a laptop in terms of productivity or functionality but if your purpose in having one is to pamper yourself with the latest gadget that will give you tons of fun, and at the same time allow you to have a stunning portable portfolio that can show off your pictures in vivid detail, then this might just be the ideal gift you can give yourself.

 

 

 


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
Tags: , , ,

No Comments »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
Counting the Dots and Upsizing

The number of pixels in an image determines how far you can enlarge your digital images in print. Each pixel represents a square in an image. The more squares there are, the greater the clarity of an image when enlarged. Usually, the general accepted standard for professional printing is 300 pixels per inch (ppi). For ordinary printing, it’s 200ppi which is more than enough for ordinary use. The difference is seen when the image is enlarged to its maximum size for which a picture can be printed.

dots1 Counting the Dots and Upsizing

How big a pixel can be depends on how far away the print is when viewed. Working out the maximum printable size for the number of pixels for your image is simple. You can use the tools in any manipulation software such as Photoshop and Elements. The image size window will show you the printable size  for the set number of pixels per inch. You can hen change the pixel concentration to make the image bigger or smaller.

There is a confusing question regarding pixels and dots. The resolution of digital images is measured in pixels which is an image file that has no physical dimension. It is only when pixels are displayed or printed where their size is visible.  Pixels per inch help calculate just exactly how big an image can appear for a particular use. Printers and paper are sold based on how many dots per inch (dpi) is their capacity. Printers can also have the option to allow you to choose dpi settings you require.

Dots per inch vary from pixels per inch in a way that dpi rating is a way of describing how small a dot of ink the printer can create on paper. The more dots of ink in a printed image it has, the finer the detail in the final outcome. This is only apparent when you use paper that has the capacity to show it. If you’re using ordinary paper, it would only be a waste of ink to use higher dpi settings.

Economy Normal and Fine– 360dpi is the minimum resolution setting when using normal paper and basic inkjet stock.

Photo – 720dpi and 1444dpi are reserved for good quality photo paper.

Photo – 2880dpi or higher is best use only for fine, glossy media.

dotscomp Counting the Dots and Upsizing

When using basic calculations, an uncropped image shot using a 3 megapixel camera can be printed at just about 10×8 inches at 200ppi. This can have a maximum output of 7×5 ices if you use 300ppi as a standard. You can however still produce larger prints with a 5 megapixel camera by manipulating the image using an editing software. By using the program, you can add more pixels to in image so that it can be further enlarged without showing the tiny squares called pixelation.

This process increase the size of the image file as well so only do this to images that need upsizing and not storing. This process is called Interpolation. By using a software to  make a guess as to how to add new pixels to older ones. Upsizing means that a image produced by a digital camera can be printed out at a far greater range of sizes than the standard norm. There can also be some quality loss, Photoshop has five Interpolation processes you can choose from. Bicubic option is for all around use. Depending on the type of image, each may produce varying results. You can choose the best tool that fits an image for better quality.

The resampling process should be done before the image is sharpened. For large changes in the number of total pixels, it is worth doing the upsizing in stages than all at once.


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
Tags: , , ,

No Comments »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
How to Minimize Digital Image Noise

Even though camera technology has advanced tremendously over the past decade, it still has not totally eradicated the presence of image noise. This usually appear as little dots or speckles over an image area that should be clear and smooth. For example, graininess might be evident in dark areas or tiny dots of pink and purple might show up across a clear sky.

noise How to Minimize Digital Image Noise

Noise can appear in your photo for different reasons. One would be when you use high ISO settings on your camera. Noise signal increases with the light signal when high ISO is used, therefore your camera will capture more light to illuminate the scene, but graininess will also be more apparent. Another cause of image noise is heat. When an image sensor heats up, photons separate from the photosites and taint other photosites. Long exposures also give your image greater risk of showing image noise, since the sensor is left open to gather more image data and this includes electrical noise.

What can we do to combat image noise? One of the most commonly used methods is to use Photoshop or another photo editing program where we can remove noise and other imperfections in post-processing. However, we can lessen the possibility of noise in-camera as well, and as they say ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!’

Try to shoot in the lowest possible ISO without compromising loss of adequate light. This will reduce the possibility of the appearance of image noise. Camera companies have acknowledged the issue and most of the recent camera models can accommodate high ISO settings, as high as 6400, without very obvious image noise. This is a far cry from cameras which captured unsightly image noise at ISO 800, and this was only a few years ago.

Protect your camera sensor from high heat. As mentioned earlier, heat can create havoc with photons and the sensor’s photosites. As the sensor works longer, such as with long exposures, constantly using live view, or during burst mode, it heats up and your shots will most likely include those tiny speckles you so want to avoid. Leaving the camera in the car on a hot day or under the sun will also cause the sensor to heat up and capture image noise.

If you have dark images and want to lighten them in post-processing, you might notice that doing so will increase the appearance of image noise, especially in the shadowy areas. To avoid this, try to shoot to the right side of your exposure meter instead to slightly overexpose the shot. You can darken certain over-exposed areas in the image in post-processing rather than lighten the shadowy areas. Fixing a shot in this manner will give you a clearer, noise-free image.

It may not be long until image noise will turn out a thing of the past. But until then, practice these in-camera tips to prevent, or at least reduce, image noise dotting and speckling your otherwise perfect shot.


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous, Photography Basics, Photography Techniques
Tags: , , , ,

No Comments »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous, Photography Basics, Photography Techniques
Quick and Easy Methods to Maximize Your Camera Battery Power

Have you ever experienced running low on battery life, or worse, the battery dying on you while you’re in the midst of capturing that elusive picture perfect moment? How about going on an outing and having the battery drain out and the day is not even half gone?  Having your camera battery die on you at the most inconvenient time can be very frustrating, to say the least. One solution for this not to happen to you is to bring spare batteries. Yet, you can also make your current batteries last longer by following some conserving habits:

battery1 Quick and Easy Methods to Maximize Your Camera Battery PowerUse the viewfinder when composing, not the Live View – yes, Live View can be very convenient since it shows you what the lens sees, and allows you to compose the shot right before you click the shutter button. However, it eats up a whole lot of battery power and whenever possible, use the viewfinder instead. To avoid parallax error when using the viewfinder (where what you see in the viewfinder is not exactly what the lens sees) allow more of the area to be included so there is little chance of anything essential being inadvertently cut out of the frame.

Don’t review every single shot using the camera – wait until you get home and have uploaded your shots to the hard drive before you review and admire or delete your shots. A lot of battery life is eaten up whenever you access the memory card and the LCD, and unless you absolutely need to look at the shot you took or you need to delete some shots to add more space, be a little more patient and review your shots in your computer instead.

Avoid using the zoom feature – zooming in and out while composing the scene is another power guzzling factor. Make your camera mechanisms work as little as possible by refraining from constantly zooming.

In between shots, keep camera on standby – turning it off completely then on again every few minutes is one sure way your battery will quickly drain. It takes more power to shut down then restart the camera compared to simply leaving it on standby mode, especially if your next shot will just be within the next minute.

Avoid built-in flash – in low-light situations, instead of using the camera’s built-in flash, look for ambient or available light sources and use those instead. The flash takes a lot of battery power when used and the resulting image might not look that attractive with the flash anyway, since it has the tendency to make one appear like deer caught in the headlights of a car.

Avoid half-pressing the shutter button if you won’t be taking a picture – like the zoom, this is another habit that will reduce battery life quicker than usual. Try to make early preparations by composing the shot in your mind and deciding on the camera angle, distance from the subject and so on before half-pressing the shutter button.


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
Tags: , ,

No Comments »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
Protect Your Camera Gear During Cold and Wet Weather

Winter months are cold and wet and for some parts of the world, just plain wet. With the first quarter of the year just starting, we will experience a lot of rain. This can spell bad news for your digital camera and equipment. When you expose them to cold, wet and warm areas all at the same time, this may have drastic effects on protect31 Protect Your Camera Gear During Cold and Wet Weatheryour valuable equipment. Unfortunately, it is during this time that you require the use of your camera more often since the holidays fall in the winter months.Here are some helpful ways to protect your camera gear from harsh weather conditions:

Keep batteries warm – the cold has an effect of draining your batteries at a much faster rate. Also, moisture may seep within the battery chamber can cause rust in the metal parts. To avoid this damage, bring spare batteries with you and keep them protected from the cold by placing them in a hand warmer or a woolen sock. See to it that the battery and the camera have the same temperature before you change batteries. 

protect21 Protect Your Camera Gear During Cold and Wet WeatherAvoid condensation- condensation or water moisture appears when you expose your camera to the cold elements and then enter a warm area. Try not to change your lens during cold conditions. To protect your camera, place it in a carrying case when not in use. When you are going to shoot outdoors, having your camera in a protective casing ensures that its response to the change of temperature is gradual. Leave a couple of dehumidifier packets inside your camera bag. Another tip to lessen condensation from showing up in your camera is to place it in a plastic freezer bag once you get in from the cold. This will make the moisture form on the bag instead of the camera.

protect11 Protect Your Camera Gear During Cold and Wet WeatherProtect your hands while taking shots – it can be difficult to work outdoors in cold weather because it can usually numb your fingers. Using gloves may keep our hands warm but they can be awkward once you start to take pictures. To have better maneuverability for your fingers, you can use soft thin gloves and mitts over them, preferably those with flaps at the tips so you can quickly access your fingers when you are ready to shoot.

Be extra careful when walking – wet and cold weather can lead to slippery ground. Be careful and try to avoid taking pictures while you are walking. Make sure that you are standing on film ground before you start to shoot and as much as possible, your shoes should be slip proof. Always wear your camera neck strap to lessen the chances of the camera slipping through your hands and falling to the ground. 

If you are very excited to see your shots as soon as you get home, you can first remove the memory card from the camera or bag and putting it in your pocket before you enter the warm indoors. This way, while the camera is warming up to room temperature, you can check out your shots in the computer.


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
Tags: , , , ,

1 Comment »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
The Uses of UV Filters and Cooling/Warming Filters

Camera filters can greatly impact the outcome of an image. Cooling or warming filters can, for example, adjust the white balance of a scene. Filters can also be used to protect the lens, as with the case of UV filters. Let us explain each in more detail: 

UV Filters:

Before the advent of digital cameras, UV filters were a must to reduce haze and improve contrast by lessening the amount of ultraviolet (UV) light that reaches the film. Digital camera sensors are not as sensitive to UV light compared to film so it makes filtration unnecessary. It is now mainly used to protect the front part of the camera lens, being clear and not visibly affecting the image. filter4 The Uses of UV Filters and Cooling/Warming Filters

Multicoated UV filters remarkably reduce the chance of flare and it also keeps your filter clean and minimizes the chances of getting poor quality of images. Great quality UV filters prevents any visible color casts. On the downside, UV filters can decrease image quality by intensifying lens flare by adding minimal color tint, or by decreasing contrast. 

It is always being debated on as to whether using a UV filter for protection is better even though it runs the risk of decrease in image quality. For high-end DSLR lenses, that added protection is the deciding factor. However, for less expensive DSLR lenses, and also for digital point-and-shoot cameras, the quality of images trumps protection. In the end, it all depends on the user. 

filter6 The Uses of UV Filters and Cooling/Warming FiltersAnother thing to consider is that with digital cameras coming out every so often with more and more options to lure even non-photography enthusiasts, we always want to upgrade our current DSLR camera to newer, better ones. One way to assure you get top dollar for reselling your old camera is to get added protection for it. UV filters does just that. It keeps the front lens in mint condition. All things considered, it can even increase image quality compared to an unfiltered lens since it can be replaced when it starts to affect the quality of an image. 

Cooling or Warming Filters: 

Cooling or warming filters affect the balance of light that reaches the camera’s sensor. This is most effective when correcting color casts. It can also add warmth filter5 The Uses of UV Filters and Cooling/Warming Filtersto a scene. For example, when weather conditions are cloudy, you can instead make it seem like the sun is setting and have the scene appear with a warm yellowish hue. 

A DSLR camera will have the feature to automatically adjust for white balance, and this can also be adjusted in post processing. However, some situations may still call for color filters, such as having to deal with unusual lighting or underwater shots where the color blue is predominant. This is because of the monochromatic light that cannot be corrected by any amount of white balance that supposedly restores full color under normal conditions. If in case it does correct white balance, there will be a noticeable amount of image noise in some color channels.


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous, Photography Basics, Photography Techniques
Tags: , , ,

No Comments »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous, Photography Basics, Photography Techniques
Facts about Filters and How to Choose a Filter Size

 

Tfilter1 Facts about Filters and How to Choose a Filter Sizehere are two points to consider when choosing a filter. Do you want to capture images that are as close to the essence of the real thing or do you want to be creative and experiment with the different effects of different kinds of filters?

There are several types of filters to choose from. There are glass filters that you can clamp or screw onto your lens. These are considered to be the toughest but can also be very expensive. There are also fragile, polyester and gelatin filters which are highly recommended for lenses with unconventional widths and when you don’t often require a filter.

You might encounter some problems using lens filters. An underlying effect of filters is that they can adversely affect the quality of an image by introducing an additional piece of glass in between the camera’s sensor and the subject. This is more noticeable in the form of slight color tint, a decrease of contrast in some, or most of the image area, or increased lens flare and ghosting caused mainly by light reflecting off the inside of the filter. 

Filters may also cause vignetting, which is the light fall-off or blackening of the image’s edges if the opaque edges of the filter obstruct the passage of light filter8 Facts about Filters and How to Choose a Filter Sizeentering the lens. A polarizer from a wide angle lens, a couple of filters on a lens or a filter with a lens hood can also cause vignetting. A solution to these issues is to use filters bigger than the lens’ screw in thread. For example, use a 62mm filter for a 58mm lens and attach it with a step-up ring. 

When choosing a filter size, there are two types of lens filters: the screw-on and front filter. Screw-on filters provide an airtight seal and can’t be accidentally moved during composition but works only for specific lens sizes. A front filter, on the other hand, is more flexible and can be used on almost any lens diameter. However, they have to be held in front of the lens, which can be a bit inconvenient. 

The size of a camera lens is listed in diameter in front of the camera in millimeters and can range from 46-82mm for Dfilter9 Facts about Filters and How to Choose a Filter SizeSLR cameras. The diameter of a screw-on filter corresponds to the diameter of the camera lens. There are also step-up or step-down adapters that can be used for different filter sizes. Remember that step-down adapters can cause vignetting since the filter can block light at the edges of the lens while step-up adapters can be a hindrance for a camera that requires a smaller filter. 

The height of the filter edges is also important. Extra thin filters as well as other specially designed filters can be utilized for wide angle lenses that will not cause vignetting but can be quite expensive and may not have threads on the exterior to allow for other filters and maybe even for the lens cap.


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous, Photography Basics, Photography Techniques
Tags: , ,

No Comments »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous, Photography Basics, Photography Techniques
Uses of Graduated Neutral Density Filters

 

GND filters, also known as split filters, limit just how much light comes through to an image. These are most needed when taking shots using natural lighting commonly encountered when taking landscape photos. 

Before the use of digital cameras, these filters were necessary to create dramatic lighting in landscape images. When using digital cameras, one could use two separate exposures and combine the two images using a linear gradient in Adobe Photoshop or other photo editing software. This technique however cannot be used with fast moving subjects or changes in light unless in single exposure shots that are twice developed from RAW file format. This method inadvertently will increase noise in an image unlike if you were to use a GND filter. This also allows you to immediately view what a photo will look like using the camera’s viewfinder or LCD. GND edges Uses of Graduated Neutral Density Filters

There are two types of settings in GND filters; one has a soft edge for a more gradual blend and the other has a hard edge to get a more abrupt blend. Choosing which to use depends on how fast the light transitions in the scene. For example, a distinct change of lighting in a scene between the ground and the sky would require a GND filter with a hard edge. An example would be a landscape which includes dark trees and fields while the sky is too bright. With the use of a hard edged GND, the available light would be let in the lower half of the frame where the trees are while less light is allowed in the section of the sky. The result is a more even lighting. 

gnd filter2 Uses of Graduated Neutral Density FiltersThe blend can also be radial to add or eradicate light fall-off at the edge of the lens’ edges, or more commonly known as vignette. 

Blending requires careful precision with the aid of a tripod. Soft edges have a tendency to be more accommodating with errors in misplacement. Hard edges can create excessive darkening or brightening in the area where the blend occurs if light transitions faster than the filter. Remember that vertical objects stretching across the blend will appear unnaturally dark.

The soft and hard edge blending technique varies depending on what tyfiltergnd2 Uses of Graduated Neutral Density Filterspe of GND filter you use. One company’s soft edge can sometime be as abrupt as another company’s hard edge. It’s a trial and error when using the filter to determine the precise outcome.

Keep in mind the differential in the amount of light allowed in one side of the blend compared to the other end.  In a previous article, we included a chart that lists how various companies designate the filters’ light reduction. A ‘0.6 grad’ is a graduated density filter resulting in 2 f-stops less light which is ¼ of light at one side of the blend compared to other. The same goes for a 0.9 ND grad, which allows 3 f-stops less light which is 1/8 on one side. Almost all of landscape images require a 1-3 f-stop blend or less.


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous, Photography Basics, Photography Techniques
Tags: , ,

1 Comment »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous, Photography Basics, Photography Techniques
Understanding Polarizing Filters and Natural Density Filters

There are many kinds of filters to help you control the light in a scene when capturing the shot. Two very common and useful filters are polarizers and natural density filters. We previously explained how polarizers can affect an image and here we will explain the difference between linear and circular types. Also, the usefulness of natural density filters will be further expounded upon.

circular filter Understanding Polarizing Filters and Natural Density FiltersLinear vs. Circular Polarizing Filters:

Circular polarizing filters are designed for metering and auto focusing functions of a camera. Usually, if the camera is equipped with autofocus, a circular polarizer is what is most advised.  Most modern cameras are equipped with a polarizing half mirror known as a split beam metering system. In most cases, a circular polarizer is needed for the meter to be accurate.

Linear polarizers are less expensive but cannot be utilized for cameras with through-the-lens (TTL) metering and auto focus, which encompasses most of the models of digital SLR cameras. You can make do without metering and auto focus, but these are sure fire ways to help improve your images.

Light rays reflecting from any surface are already polarized. Polarizing filters selects what kinds of rays are allowed into your camera’s lens. Linear polarizing (PL) and filterpolar3 Understanding Polarizing Filters and Natural Density FiltersCircular polarizing (CIR) filters do the same, but it’s important to know what best suits your camera. This permits you to filter out any undesirable reflections from surfaces that are non-metallic such as glass and water. It also allows color saturation and makes hues more vivid with improved contrast without affecting the color balance of an image as a whole.

Neutral Density (ND) filters:

ND filters function by lessening the light that reaches the camera’s sensor. This is most helpful when long exposures are not possible in a range of apertures that are set at the lowest ISO setting.

These may best be applicable in scenarios where you need to smooth out a shot when trying to capture images that include flowing water such as rivers, waterfalls and oceans. ND filters can help you attain a shallower depth of field in bright light situations. It also helps reduce diffraction which also reduces sharpness by allowing a larger aperture to make subjects in motion appear less defined, allowing blur to indicate movement.

ND filters are best applicable when trying to diminish light. Now light can be reduced by using faster shutter speeds, or using a smaller aperture which will impact depth of field. However, by using an ND filter, it allows you to reduce light without compromising your exposure settings. You can have a slower shutter speed or a larger lens opening without fear that the shot will be overexposed. 

The table below is a guide on attaining the correct amount of light required in a shot using the different ND filters based on the general information already provided by relevant companies:

filter chart Understanding Polarizing Filters and Natural Density Filters

Just a couple of ND filters are needed to achieve extreme light reduction to allow long exposures in broad daylight and a few f-stops for subjects in motion.


Share |

Submit a Photography Article!

Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous
Tags: , , ,

No Comments »
Print This Post Email This Post
Permalink | Posted in Articles, Cameras and Equipment, Miscellaneous