Photography Theme Ideas Using Color

 

Are you having a hard time figuring out what to shoot? In case you are running out of inspiration, look to color for help. Here’s a list of fun colorful theme ideas you can use for practicing your skills:

purple Photography Theme Ideas Using ColorMonochrome – this term usually implies black and white images in photography but it also means an image that shows only a single color in different shades. The image might show black or white accents but no other colors are included. By focusing on only one color, you can boost a certain mood which that color can evoke. For example, a predominantly blue image can give one the impression of tranquility while an image that is mostly bright yellow can make one feel energetic and warm.

Pastel – light or pale colors imply softness and tranquility. Look for these colors and try to capture the mood that they present. Diffused lighting usually accompanies pastel colors to accentuate the mood all the more. You can experiment with harder lighting on pastel colors and see what impact it would give the image.

Vivid –unlike pastel colors which can calm and soothe the viewer’s senses, images showing vivid colors can give off energy and excitement. You can capture the vibrancy of colors by choosing vivid colors themselves or you can make them appear vivid with the use of lighting. Backlighting, for example, can give a glow to see-through colored objects making them look like they’re glowing. Plastic objects, flowers and even fruit or vegetable slices might have the usual colors but place them in front of a strong light and the colors will suddenly become brighter.

Selective desaturation – by turning the image into black and white except for a specific object which stays in color, you can create dramatic impact to the shot. The eye automatically focuses on that one portion in the frame that shows color and if processed well, it can boost the viewer’s impression of the image. You must be careful with this technique, however, since it has fallen into the realm of ‘cliché’.  For example, wedding photos are constantly being selectively desaturated with the cd Photography Theme Ideas Using Colorbride and groom in black and white, while the bouquet of red roses is still in bright color. There is nothing wrong with this. After all, if it looks great then it doesn’t matter if it is cliché. The pitfall is if it isn’t composed and edited well, then it can look cheesy or just plain ugly.

Colorful – for this theme, try to include as many colors as you can without the image looking cluttered. It takes skill to do that since the colors can compete for attention and the point of interest might get lost in the process. Too many colors can also be an eyesore. Rainbows, patterned cloth, art supplies, flowers, iridescent insects, these are all very colorful in themselves. You can also set up the shot by grouping certain objects to show splashes of color. Using colored lights on your subject is another way to show off the color spectrum.

 


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Make the Most Out of Your Phone Camera

 

Remember when cameras used to be just cameras and telephones were used just to call people? These days, gadgets are designed to multi-task. You can now use phones to do many things such as take pictures, access the internet, and send written messages. One obvious advantage of having a camera phone is that it is very convenient for you to take a picture whenever you want to, if you’re the type who always has a mobile phone nearby. You don’t have to stick a bulky camera in your bag all the time in the off chance that you’ll see something interesting enough to shoot on the way to the store.

hut Make the Most Out of Your Phone Camera

Of course, the features of mobile phone cameras are severely limited. You won’t have much control since there aren’t much adjustment settings to play with, the resolution is lower than a regular camera, and the image quality might not be up to par. However, there are new models out in the market that are addressing these liabilities, and technology is evolving so fast that pretty soon mobile phone cameras will be able to compete with regular point and shoot cameras. 

At this time, the megapixels (MP) of camera phones can range from VGA to over 12MP. I must stress that the image quality is not necessarily proportional to the number of megapixels. Having a high MP count simply means your picture can be printed in bigger sizes. Of course, a very low MP such as 1MP means you will end up with a small sized image which you might not be able to satisfactorily post process without losing quality. A 3MP camera phone is sufficient in most cases (The two photos in this article were taken with a 2MP camera phone). 

To get the most out of your mobile phone camera, keep a few things in mind:

 Light your subject well – if it is well lighted, you won’t need to use the flash which may wash out your subject or blow out the scene. Your subject will also appear clearer and crisper with not much image noise or grain. Since you don’t have much control over exposure, try to have adequate lighting in-camera so that there will be little post processing needed.

Go closer – far away objects might come out blurred or too small to be recognizable. Avoid using the digital zoom (if it has this feature) if you can since this can reduce image quality by making pixels bigger. Also, try not to crop in post processing to make your subject look larger in the frame. This will also negatively affect the quality. Instead, go closer to your subject but not too close or again, the image will be out of focus.

Don’t move while you’re taking the shot – camera phones (at least mine isn’t) are not equipped with shutter speed adjustment settings. There seems to be no way to tell just how fast the shutter moves so best to keep still when you take the shot since there’s a possibility it will show camera shake.

garlic Make the Most Out of Your Phone Camera

 

Play with the camera modes – many camera phones have modes such as panorama, night mode and sequence mode. Your phone might even have a video mode. These are all very easy to use since they basically do the hard work for you. The panorama mode will stitch several pictures into one right then and there and the night mode can automatically illuminate dark areas.

Take lots of pictures – your phone screen might be too small to make any photo mistakes noticeable. If you’re used to taking five shots of a subject with a regular camera, take ten shots at least with your camera phone. Some of them might be blurry or pixilated and you won’t be able to tell until you upload the images in the computer. If you have lots of shots, at least there will be more options to choose from.

Take pictures with crazy camera angles – phone cameras can go where regular cameras might have difficulty accessing. No, I’m not implying that you become a voyeur. Just that you don’t have to stick to the usual ‘camera at eye level’ position. Camera phones are really small and thin compared to ordinary cameras and easier to handle. You can take a shot with one hand and play around by angling the phone in an unusual viewpoint. 

Clean your lens – the phone camera lens might be tiny but it doesn’t mean you don’t need to clean it. It’s a common oversight not to wipe the lens properly and your shot might blurry not because of camera shake but because of the dried up sweat that has built up on the lens (yes, it’s a gross thought). We handle our phones all the time; we put them in our pockets, stick them to our ears, keep a firm grip on them as we walk, on place them on public tables or countertops. Can you imagine the dirt that can accumulate on the lens if you don’t bother to clean it? A cleaning cloth used for eyeglasses or sunglasses will do the trick.


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5 Useful Tips on Shooting Nature Macro

One favorite photo theme is nature macro. Nature is a willing and attractive subject and it does not take very much effort for us to get good shots. By using the macro technique, we can present nature in ways that others wouldn’t normally see, perhaps the furry edges of a moth wing or the cracked vein patterns of a leaf. Listed below are a few suggestions for getting great nature macro shots:

butterfly 5 Useful Tips on Shooting Nature Macro

Be observant – nature abounds with millions of fascinating details and chances of hidden beauty and all we have to do is look. It’s astounding just how varied natural patterns, colors, or textures are. The trick is to notice them. By capturing them in an image, you will have the opportunity to share with others a world that is seldom noticed and appreciated. When Mother Nature is your subject, there is no lack of something appealing to shoot.

Be patient – when taking macro shots of creatures such as insects, patience is a must since it can be difficult to make them pose the way you want them to. They fly, they crawl, they jump, they do anything it seems but stay still long enough for you to get a good focus on them for a shot. If you want to take a picture of a butterfly fluttering from flower to flower, you might have to follow it around and shoot as soon as it lands on a blossom. You will probably end up with a lot of blurry shots but with enough patience, you might find one or two gems in the bunch. 

Camera capabilities – most point and shoots have a macro mode which can take fantastic images. Some even have a super macro mode for extreme close up shots. DSLRs can be fitted with macro lenses that can take fine and crisp shots. Optical zooms can also make the subject appear much closer than normal. Whatever camera you have, find out if it is capable of taking decent close up shots. If you can’t get any closer to the subject without it becoming blurry, you can make a shot appear macro by cropping the image in post processing.

Get down and dirty – when photographing nature macro, there are two common ways to go about setting up the shot. One is in a studio with all the lights and umbrella stands and maybe a few special macro lenses. The other is down on your knees, hunting for creepy crawlies, flowers or leaf patterns. Although the second option will get you dirty, it might also be more fun. Shooting the subject in its natural habitat has its pros and cons. Although you will not have as much control as in a stanthurium 5 Useful Tips on Shooting Nature Macro udio, the subject (if a creature) will appear more at ease if shot in its surroundings. Flowers and leaves can also be photographed without you having to pluck and discard them after the shoot. Indirect sunlight is also one of the best light sources around and can beautifully illuminate the subject.

Capture color – one reason why nature is so visually appealing is that color plays a big part in it. Colors are used to entice prey or to ward off predators, and flowers are breathtaking in their display of colors, from the deep dark crimson of roses to the most delicate of lavender hues of, well, lavender. Solid colors, color blends, pastel shades, vivid hues, just look around and you’ll be amazed at the splashes of color that only nature can provide in abundance. Try to capture color in your macro shots, whether it is a flower petal or the iridescent wing of an insect.

 

 


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ISO and its Effect on Image Quality

 

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is one of the three elements that make up the exposure triangle.  The other two are shutter speed and aperture. In film photography, it measures how sensitive the film is to light and in digital photography, ISO measures the sensitivity of the camera sensor to the light.  Adjusting the ISO greatly affects the fineness of the image since it direct impacts how much film grain or image noise will be visible.

prawns ISO and its Effect on Image Quality

The principles of ISO are the same for both film and digital photography. ISO is measured with the numbers 80, 100, 200, 400 and so on. Some high-end cameras feature numbers as high as ISO 3200. When you lessen the ISO number, the grain or noise becomes less visible. This makes the image look finer and have a better image quality. The higher the ISO number, the more sensitive the camera is to the light and the more obvious the image noise. This makes the image appear grainy and it loses some of its quality. Graininess is not necessarily a bad thing especially if you're using it deliberately to create a mood. In this case, a very high ISO would be ideal.

Just like shutter speed and aperture, ISO is adjusted depending on the available light. ISO 100 is an ideal setting because your images retain their fineness and crispness. However, in low light conditions, you might need to maintain a fast shutter speed or a small aperture in which case you might be forced to increase the ISO settings in order to capture more light. The result is a better lighted image but the repercussion is a more grainy effect.

The common low light situations are indoor birthday parties, indoor sporting events or games, and night scenes. There are places which do not allow you to use flash such as galleries or theatres so to compensate for inadequate lighting, a higher ISO might be used.

A lot of beginner photographers use Auto mode, which does the job of automatically selecting the ISO settings based on the scene. It is advisable that you use Manual mode whenever possible so you can practice adjusting the exposure settings. You will then have more control over the outcome of the image. 


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How to Crop Your Photos to Maximize Visual Impact

 

When we take pictures, we make a lot of decisions right before we press that shutter button. Not only do we think of what parts of the subject or scene we want to include in the frame, but just as importantly, we also have to decide what parts to leave out. However, there are times when we look at the photos we have taken and discover they could either have been composed better or there might be distracting elements that should not have been part of the shot. Using the crop tool often works to solve the problem. Another option is to reshoot but that might not be necessary if we are successful in cropping the shot to our liking. 

Using the Crop Tool

The crop tool is found in most, if not all photo editing software. To crop in Adobe Photoshop, choose the crop tool then click on the edge of the area you want to keep. Drag the cursor while holding down the left mouse button until the entire selected area has been highlighted in a square or rectangle. Anything that is not included in the selection will be cut or cropped. If you want a perfect square crop, press on the Shift keyboard button as you make your selection. If you want to maintain the pixel aspect ratio, select the entire image first, then hold down the Shift keyboard button as you move the little square found at any of the four corners of the frame to make the selection smaller. You can always move the crop selection to certain parts of the image.

You can also rotate the crop selection by pointing your cursor a little bit away from one of the four crop corners. Instead of a straight arrow, you will see a curved arrow. Once it appears, press the mouse button and you can now rotate the crop selection to the desired angle.

Take note to crop using a duplicate of the original image. When you save the image, most editing programs will replace the original with the cropped version.  

Crop Sizes

  • For printing – if you are planning to print your shots, make sure you did not crop too much of your shot at you’ll be left with a one inch image. When you crop an image, you are also resizing it because you are getting rid of pixels that make up the size of the image. By clicking on the arrow beside the Crop tool, you will see a dropdown list of the conventional picture sizes such as 4 by 5 inches or 8 by 10 inches.
  • For online publishing – the crop size really depends on what you are going to use it for. If you are selling your photos, keep your image resolution at its highest since it's the buyers who will crop your image, if needed. If you are going to present your photos in a portfolio, make sure the image is large enough so that the little details can be seen and appreciated.

Crop to Remove Background Clutter

dessert before How to Crop Your Photos to Maximize Visual Impact

A lot of distracting elements can be eliminated with the simple action of cropping them out of the shot. In this photo, the hand and fork were distracting so they were cropped out. I wanted the textures of the dessert to be apparent, from the moist chdessert after How to Crop Your Photos to Maximize Visual Impactocolate cake to the gooey caramel oozing down the sides to the smooth cherry nestled on top. With a tight crop and a simple white background, these various textures were brought forward.

 

Crop to Improve Composition

Cropping is also a very effective way to improve on the balance and composition of the image. For example, if your subject is smack dab in the center of the frame and you prefer it to be off to one side, use the Rule of Thirds when you crop. By cropping one side of the image, you are moving the placement of the subject in the frame, thus no longer making it centered. 

The original shot below left shows the wire bisecting the middle of the frame. By rotating the crop selection, the photo on the right shows the bird now located at the left side of the shot and the wire is now cutting the frame in a diagonal angle which provides more tension and impact.

birds How to Crop Your Photos to Maximize Visual Impact

 

 

Try various ways to crop your image. You can achieve different interpretations with thoughtful cropping.

 


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Shooting in Direct Sunlight

 

 

Sunlight can be a photographer’s best friend since it is a natural light source that can illuminate your subject in several different ways, free of cost. Knowing how to use sunlight to get an intended effect is part of the tricks of the trade. Many people prefer to shoot on a bright but cloudy day when the scene is adequately lit but the intensity of the light is just enough not to cause any harsh and strong shadows. There are other times, however, when you just can’t wait for the clouds to come and you have to shoot in direct sunlight.

Direct sunlight can negatively impact the shot. It can cause blown out highlights, hard shadows, chromatic aberration, lens flare and oversaturated colors. These are quite a lot of issues that we have to consider but there are simple ways to counter the problems we might face when shooting in the bright light of day.

Shoot in the shade – If you’re shooting a person or a portable object, transfer to the shade.  Be prepared and bring an umbrella or a sheet of cloth in case there is no shade nearby. This also drastically lessens the chances of the subject to squint from the sun’s glare. A photo of a person squinting will not look so good.

Use fill flash – direct sunlight behind a subject will darken the foreground. By using a flash to illuminate it, you can make sure that the subject’s features will be more visible. Adjust the intensity of the flash to a setting less than its regular output so that the lighting will appear more natural rather than as if the subject was caught by a car’s headlights.

Change the perspective – just moving your camera at a different angle can cut down on glare caused by the sun. Move around your subject; play around with different camera viewpoints until you are satisfied with the composition as well as the lighting.

 

polarized 1024x768 Shooting in Direct SunlightUse a filter – a polarized filter can mean a world of difference when shooting in bright sunlight. It cuts atmospheric haze and darkens scenes that looked washed out by the glare. Colors come out more vibrant with less blown out areas. If you don’t have a polarizer, you can improvise by using a pair of polarized sunglasses instead. This photo shows the outcome of using the sun shades with polarized lens. The upper left portion that hasn’t been included in the glasses’ frame looks very different from the area which the lens covers.

Use a lens hood – lens hoods are pretty basic accessories but they do help a lot in shielding the lens from the sun’s harsh glare. A lens hood lessens the possibility of lens flare and chromatic aberration.

Use a diffuser – a simple diffuser such as a white sheet or foam board can soften the intensity of the harsh light. This creates a more even lighting for your subject and reduces areas that might become over or underexposed without the diffuser.

Turn your subject into a silhouette – If your subject appears too dark because of the sun hitting it directly from behind, and you choose not to or are not able to use a fill flash, then turn your subject into a silhouette instead. Lines, shapes and textures become prominent as well as the mood of a scene can become more dramatic. Ships sailing on bright empty seas, trees swaying in the heat of the sun, people frolicking on the shore, these and many more would make fantastic silhouette shots.

 


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Photographing the Beauty in Urban Decay

Man-made structures that are falling apart or have been abandoned a long time ago seem to captivate and enthrall us, whether we are photographers or not. Maybe it is because we are pulled to their beauty even in the face of dilapidation. Or perhaps there is something about the way these crumbling buildings look that resonates within us; that even strong foundations can collapse, that over time people can deface it with graffiti, or that nature will always try to take back her territory.

poolweb Photographing the Beauty in Urban DecayTaking photographs of urban decay can take you on an adventure into places that are little visited or have been forgotten by most people. They may be large in scale such as ruins of buildings, or something up close such broken doorknobs or corroded window frames. The following are some tips that will help you make the most of urban decay photography:

Do a little research – although you might come across a lot of urban decay as you travel your city streets, you might be surprised that after doing some research, there are many more that you didn’t know about. Also, try to know a bit more about the area you will photograph before visiting the place. They often have some interesting history behind them, and how they ended up like that can give you insights on how to approach your composition. For example, if you are going to photograph a broken down house, knowing that it had previously caught fire will give you an idea of the meaning of those blackened patterns on the walls. These places have stories to tell, it’s up to you to listen and make use of them in your photographs.

Bring a flashlight – if you’re planning to shoot indoors, a flashlight would come in handy since most likely the place won’t have any working electricity. Even in the daytime, the space might be dark and gloomy, especially if the windows are all covered in grime. That is, if there are still any windows intact. It will also illuminate possible debris that is strewn around the room. Small rusty nails, splintered wood, and broken glass can be dangerous and wound you if you step on them.

Request permission – although many abandoned locations have long been forgotten, there are those for which you might still need permission to access and take photos of. Just because no one is using the structure anymore doesn’t mean you won’t have to worry about trespassing.

Shoot at different times in the day – the environment where your subject is located can be drastically different at different hours in the day, especially if it is situated in a very public area. If you want little distractions, a short time after dawn is a good hour to shoot. Most of the people are still asleep or in their homes so if you are taking pictures of urban decay in a populated setting, there will be fewer distractions from Lincolnweb Photographing the Beauty in Urban Decaypeople passing by and obstructing your lens. The lighting will be great since the morning sun will still be at the horizon, giving off diffused light. This same location, however, might appear entirely different during rush hour. For example if your structure is a rundown building, crowds of people might be passing it by, oblivious to it being there. Street children might be playing hide and seek in it or someone might be tacking an advertisement on its wall. The impact may come out different from your early morning shoot but may still be just as powerful.

Play with details – there are times when you can capture the essence of a decrepit structure by focusing on only a portion. Instead of trying to include the entire building in your shot, try to concentrate on only the stairs, for example, or the door. This makes the viewer see much more details such as the textures of rusty metal or chipped paint, the faded wallpaper design, or the lush green vines that are wrapped around a banister.

Travel light – don’t take gear that is more than you can comfortably carry. You will be moving around a lot as you look for strategic positions to take your picture and the last thing you would want to feel is weighed down by excess gear. Your camera, a tripod, and if you have a DSLR, an extra lens such as a wide-angle lens should be enough.

Use the surroundings – the area around your subject can place it within context and can provide more drama to your shot. If your decaying structure is smack dab in the middle of a busy commercial area, you can tell a story by including the bright and shiny establishment that stands right beside it. People can also provide context by how they react to or ignore your subject. Observe what is going on in the scene, there are usually a lot of photo opportunities to be had as long as you are prepared.

 

 


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How to Photograph Bubbles

Photographing bubbles can be quite frustrating because they are one subject that disappears on you in the space of a few seconds. They seem to pop right when you press the shutter button. Plus they are extremely fragile, they can float away from you, are very hard to hold, hard to focus on and are transparent so you’ll really need to watch your background.

bubbles How to Photograph BubblesHowever, the effort is worth it because they are very pretty to look at, can be iridescent like a rainbow caught in a tiny orb, they provide a sense of whimsy, and they make interesting shapes since they can attach to each other to form a cluster.

To shoot bubbles, you must first have a bubble solution. You can buy it from toy stores and hobby shops but you can also create your own with a few key ingredients. 

Homemade bubble solution:

Mix around 1/3 cup of liquid detergent (preferably Joy Ultra) in a cup of water. Add a teaspoon of glycerin or sugar. This will help stabilize the bubble shape to make it last longer before it bursts. Leave the mixture alone for at least a few hours. Your bubble wand can just a length of wire that has been looped to form a circle with a handle.

Lighting bubbles can be tricky. Sunlight does a great job of it since it can evenly light the bubbles. Take note that they can reflect whatever is near them such as trees, bushes, your house, even yourself. If you are indoors and want to take a close-up shot, a bright lamp will do but you’ll have to strategically place it in such a way that it doesn’t get reflected in the bubble. You can use a large white sheet to bounce off the light. This will show the bubble’s iridescence without the lamp also appearing in the image. Another light source can be a flash. Place a black backdrop, focus on the area where your bubbles will be, then use the flash when the bubbles are in position. Try using the burst mode if your camera has that feature.

The camera settings really depend on your setup. If you are outdoors in the sunlight, then a fast shutter speed will freeze those bubbles in mid-air. If you are indoors and are taking macro shots, a slow shutter speed such as ¼ of a second might work better. Since bubbles explode, they usually leave a soapy residue so be careful of sticking your camera lens too close to the bubble. 

Rainbow Swirls How to Photograph BubblesThere are all kinds of bubbles, from the blow bubbles children play with to those you get when you shake the shampoo bottle. There are giant bubbles and there are tiny ones. There’s even bubble film, which is the flat ‘sheet’ of bubble on the bubble wand before you swipe it in the air or blow on it to form a bubble globe.

There are so many ways of photographing bubbles, some use an elaborate setup while others just use whatever is at hand. Experiment with other people’s tactics or be inventive and create your own setup. Also experiment with composition by thinking out of the box. Bubbles are already naturally visually appealing but are quite common subjects.  It’s up to you to make your bubble image pop (yes, pun is intended) and stand out from the rest.


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Understanding the Histogram

One of the most useful yet most ignored camera features is the histogram. The histogram is available in most, if not all, digital cameras. It can be viewed in the LCD while you are also composing your shot, or separately after the image is taken.

histogram Understanding the Histogram

What does a histogram do, exactly? Simply put, it measures the brightness of a scene.  You will see a graph with a strip below it showing black at the left and white at the right, with all the gradients of gray in between. This includes all the pixels in your image.  Now the graph counts the number or pixels at each level between the black and white areas in an image. The deepest darkest shadows are to the left of the graph and the bright highlights are found at the right. The heights of points in the graph shows how many pixels are found at a certain brightness level.

If your image is underexposed and is very dark, most of the pixels will be situated at the left side of the histogram, probably even hitting the left edge. If the scene is too bright, majority of the pixels will be at the right side. This histogram shows most of the pixels in the middle area, which means the scene or image is more or less evenly exposed. An evenly spread pixel area doesn’t mean your image is now perfect, just that the exposure is balanced. The histogram of a dark key image might show most of the pixels at the left of the graph but that’s okay because you intentionally are making the image dark.

Although the best judge of the exposure of a scene is still our eyes, the histogram can greatly aid us when it is hard to see the image in the LCD such as when we are out in the sunlight. With this graph, we can also foresee whether the scene will come out too dark or too bright and we can adjust our camera settings accordingly. 


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Photographing Silhouettes

 

When we take photos of subjects, we usually make sure the viewer can see them in all their glory, from their colors to their features. Yet, we can also shoot them as silhouettes, which can provide drama and mood to the image.

The following are a few helpful hints to getting a great silhouette shot:

lightbulb Photographing Silhouettes

Show distinctive shapes – When an object becomes a silhouette, it looks black and therefore loses much detail except for its shape and the textures at its edges. You will be presenting your three dimensional subject in a two dimensional manner so they must be distinct. Subjects with strong recognizable shapes make great silhouettes since these shapes are what will make the shot work.

Choose the subject’s angle – the angle of your subject should also be carefully considered because certain angles will not look as attractive as others. If your subject is a person, for example, having them in profile will show off the shape of the face and the details at the edges such as eyelashes or a beard. If they face the camera straight on, we will instead see the shape of the face and the outline of the hair.

Keep the shapes separate – Don’t place your subjects in front of each other. If your subjects overlap, they can appear as one unrecognizable or unappealing shape. Give them some space by keeping them separate during setup. This will also make the image look less cluttered and chaotic. 

Set exposure based on the light, not the subject – adjust your camera settings to give proper exposure to the lighted areas rather than the subject. This will underexpose the subject and make it even darker.

Use backlighting – to create a silhouette, the light should be behind the subject. This illuminates the area around the subject while keeping the front of the subject in darkness. Sunlight can be a fantastic light source because it can backlight subjects or scenes in the early morning or late afternoon when it is at the horizon. A lot of sunrise/sunset photographs depict silhouettes of people, architecture, trees, or animals in the foreground. For indoor shots, an ordinary lamp with a bright bulb is sufficient to turn subjects to silhouettes.

Experiment – Play around with macro setting, go crazy with your choice of subject, and fiddle with how they will be positioned in the composition. Transparent objects can be very fascinating because you can see the shapes of their insides. Capture mood by using bold colors or dramatic lighting in the background, or by how the subject interacts with its surroundings.


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