8 More Essential Tips to Follow When Photographing Wedding Ceremonies

 

There are so many things to consider when photographing wedding events, especially the ceremony itself. We gave you 10 essential tips in a previous article and here are 8 more to help you prepare for the big event: 

weddingaisle 8 More Essential Tips to Follow When Photographing Wedding Ceremonies1. The presence of ambient light will provide extra illumination to your images and they can also certainly add to the mood to the image.  Candles or sunlight streaming from the church windows can boost visual appeal. 

2. Keep a shot list of the peoplthat you have to shoot during the ceremony aside from the bride and groom such as the parents, close friends, aunts and uncles, and grandparents. This will keep you focused especially when there is a large number of people who have attended. Familiarize yourself with their faces so they can be easy to spot in the crowd.  

3. Make sure that you are ready outside the church when the bride arrives since it is an important moment that you cannot miss. Take shots of her getting out of the car with her father, and some poses of her and the bridal entourage by the church doorway. Try to be quick, though, usually two to three minutes is sufficient. 

weddingchurch 8 More Essential Tips to Follow When Photographing Wedding Ceremonies4. Photograph the bride as she walks up the aisle with her father. Also remember to take pictures of the guests’ reaction and the groom’s expression as he looks at his bride. Your job is not simply to record the sequence of events but also to capture the strong emotions and vibrant atmosphere permeating the room. 

5. Also keep a shot list of the essential key moments in the ceremony such as when the bride and groom meet at the altar, when they light the wedding candles, the exchange of vows, the exchange of wedding rings and the kiss after the priest pronounces them as man and wife. 

6. Be discreet. A wedding ceremony is a solemn occasion and no one would like it if you were walking back and forth in front of everyone just to get shots of the bride and groom. Find a position where you have a good view of the couple and the guests without them noticing you too much. For example, during the exchange of wedding rings, zoom in on the rings and the hands from a spot by the aisle. Do not go up to them by the altar just so you can get a good close up shot. 

weddingout 8 More Essential Tips to Follow When Photographing Wedding Ceremonies7. During the signing of the register, take shots of the priest with the newlyweds, as well as the entourage. The bride and groom might be the center of attention in the ceremony but remember to take as much shots of everyone else, especially the special people that the bride and groom would want to have lots of photos of as well. 

8. As the bride and groom walk down the aisle and outside of the church, this is a moment full of photo opportunities. Make sure you have shots of the couple’s faces in close up, full body shots of them walking out the church door, and the expressions of the guests as they throw rice and congratulate the couple. Remember to adjust camera settings for outdoor exposures.

 

 


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10 Essential Tips to Follow When Photographing the Wedding Ceremony

 

 

The ceremony is considered the most important part of the whole wedding event. A lot of preparation would have been done into making the ceremony perfect, and every detail carefully arranged by several people, from the wedding planner to the mother of the bride. As the photographer, it is your responsibility to be as prepared and meticulous when recording the ceremony. Here are several suggestions to guide you when shooting the wedding ceremony:

 weddingnew5 10 Essential Tips to Follow When Photographing the Wedding Ceremony1. If the wedding is big, with hundreds of guests and a wide church area, it would be an advantage to have an assistant. Someone who can help carry all your gear and help you guide people in group shots means you will have more time to focus on the actual picture taking.

2. Having an extra photographer would also be a plus. You will have more shots to choose from and give to the newlyweds. Another boon is that you both can cover two strategic areas in the church area rather than just one. 

3. Try different angles and perspectives when shooting from the aisle to give greater visual impact. Being in a room filled with people allows you to take several shots that include a lot of guests in one shot. Since they will be seated for most of the time, you have more opportunities to set up your composition.

 4. Lights from a flash can be distracting so ask the priest’s permission beforehand if you can use a flash. Never fire the flash repeatedly at the bride and groom’s faces. This is one sure way to irk them and not want to refer you in the future.

weddingfingers 10 Essential Tips to Follow When Photographing the Wedding Ceremony

5. Whenever you are not using a tripod, use camera settings that will not capture camera shake. Keep your shutter speed to at least 1/60 because any slower than that will increase the effects of camera shake.

6. Take note of the aperture size since this has a direct impact on depth of field. If you want to take a shot of only the bride and groom without including the guests behind them, you can use a shallower depth of field to blur out the background. Alternatively, you can set it to keep as much of the scene in focus. 

7. Use a long lens such as a 70-200 zoom to keep track of the movements of the key people in the wedding. This way you won’t be interfering with the actual ceremony and be as discreet as possible. weddinghold 10 Essential Tips to Follow When Photographing the Wedding Ceremony

8. If you will be using fill flash indoors, also use a flash diffuser to soften the intensity of the light. 

9. Use memory cards with lots of memory space so you won’t need to change it during the ceremony. 4GIG or 8GIG memory cards will do, especially if you are shooting in RAW since that would create huge image files. 

10. Check out the church before the ceremony so you have a good idea of its layout, where you can set up your tripod, which areas would make great backgrounds, and what the lighting is like so you know what kind of extra light sources you will need to use.


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Wedding Portraiture Tips

Wedding portraiture begins as early as when the bride and groom are just getting dressed up. It is ideal to take the series of portrait shots at the beginning of the wedding before the ceremony begins so everything from the make-up, hair, clothing and emotions are all fresh. This will also prevent any delays in the ceremony and it’s easier to round up members of the family for family portraits.

weddingkiss Wedding Portraiture TipsOrchestrating the perfect wedding portraits entail dealing with a client base that comes in all shapes and sizes. This also goes for the venue and the weather. It would take a lot of lighting skills and different poses to achieve fantastic shots. Make sure you’re familiar with the types of lighting you can use in different types of weather and a variety of traditional and not so traditional poses for your subjects in any given situation.

Although candid shots can make the poses appear natural and sweet, it would be important that you include static and formal shots such as the bride and groom looking straight at the camera. These are the more typical shots families would like to have. One such pose is the classic portrait of the bride and groom in solo shots, as well as shots where they are together. Typical sizes included in this type of portrait shots are full length, 3/4 and close-up forms of all the portrait shots.

weddingsign Wedding Portraiture TipsOnce the traditional yet important portraiture portion is completed, the fun part of showing your creative side now comes into play. Start by taking a succession of informal and relaxed portraits of the bride and groom. Try to make it fun for the couple and treat the next sessions as part of their own collection of their memories.

When doing group portraits, include the families of both the bride and groom as well as the wedding entourage. Make sure that you are familiar with the guests and the important members of the family as well as friends that the couple would like to include in the group portraits. It would be handy to have a list of names and their relationship to the bride and groom to keep you up to date on such a busy day.

Pay particular attention to being equal in terms of covering both sides of the couple’s family. Make sure that whatever portrait shots the bride has from her side of the family, the groom also has on his side.

Most times, individual shots of key figures are also essential. Don’t miss out on having enough portraits with parents, grandparents, siblings, and key members of the wedding such as the best man and bridesmaid.

weddingnew3 Wedding Portraiture TipsThe venue plays a major role in a wedding shoot. It’s important that the full glory of the place is captured in the photographs. Place emphasis on the beautiful areas in the location so you can position the bride and groom here for a few poses.

Wedding portraits are mementos that the bride and groom and family members will display and share with everyone else. This would be the time when your shots have to shine since your clients depend on you to record their most special day. You can let the photographs speak for themselves and satisfied customers will want to refer you to others. 


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What to Prepare on Your First Wedding Photo Shoot

 

Wedding photography is a lucrative business and you might have felt it is time to be in on the action. In shooting weddings, the photographer has a huge responsibility to make sure all the special moments are recorded. Since it’s your first time to shoot a wedding event, there could be butterflies in your stomach and stress as well, as excitement might start to bridal rice by betacam What to Prepare on Your First Wedding Photo Shootmount up. You might start to think you’re more nervous than the bride to be as the wedding date looms closer. There’s one thing that can lessen those jitters and that is knowing that you’re prepared.

Make a shot list– you can take dozens of various photos of the whole event but there are some that you just must take. Photos of the wedding cake, the bride and groom at the altar, the wedding dance and so on are just a few of the ‘must shoot’ subjects. Also ask the bride and groom what or who they want you to include in a photo since there could be special people you might not know about and might overlook when taking photos.

Bring an assistant if you can – someone who can help carry your equipment for you and do some crowd control will make it easier for you to concentrate on getting the shots. Not only that, the assistant could be your friend or relative who will provide moral support, even indirectly, just by being with you. Better yet, bring someone who can also take photographs. There could be a big gathering of people in a large area and having another photographer in a strategic location means you don’t have to cover the entire area and event yourself.

Bring extras of your camera gear – extra batteries, extra memory cards, especially an extra camera. It’s always good to have extra gear since you never know when one of them could suddenly stop working. It would be a disaster to have your weddinghands by buzzybee What to Prepare on Your First Wedding Photo Shootcamera conk out and not have a back up right in the middle of the ceremony. If you don’t have extras, rent the equipment or borrow them since this is one time when it is essential to be prepared.

Check out the site beforehand – it is best to be at the location at the same time of day that the wedding will happen so you have a good idea of what settings you’ll be using. Scout the ideal locations for group shots and also check out the light conditions.

Be discreet – in wanting to get great shots, it is possible to forget that there is a ceremony going on and people can become bothered by you constantly moving around. One way to lessen being disruptive is to take shots less often and to time your picture taking during sermons and hymns Also make sure your camera doesn’t make sounds such as beeps since this can be distracting for others.

Be aware of your surroundings – you might find yourself in the middle of a crowd during the reception and could bump into people holding wine glasses or that delicate tall ornament that you didn’t notice since you were too busy looking through the lens.

This list is by no means finished since there are dozens more tips to help you prepare for shooting the big event. Stay tuned for more tips in forthcoming articles!


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